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Breastfeeding for Even 1 Day: Part 1

Posted by elizjcurran on December 14, 2014 at 6:40 AM Comments comments (0)


This is a reblog from: https://crazy8breastfeeding.wordpress.com/2014/12/11/breastfeeding-for-even-1-day-part-1/

Visit our FB page @ https://www.facebook.com/breastfeedingcafevt


Breastfeeding your baby for even a day is an amazing gift that you can give to your baby!

1. When you nurse your baby for even just a couple days…

When you nurse your baby for even just a couple days he will be taking in your colostrum. Colostrum gives your baby antibodies to help fight infection. It is his first immunization. Breastfeeding also helps your body recover after giving birth. Your body is made to breastfeed your baby. Your body and your baby knows this.

This colostrum is like a golden miraculous natural vaccine. Info about colostrum from La Leche League International:

Your breasts produce colostrum beginning during pregnancy and continuing through the early days of breastfeeding. This special milk is yellow to orange in color and thick and sticky. It is low in fat, and high in carbohydrates, protein, and antibodies to help keep your baby healthy. Colostrum is extremely easy to digest, and is therefore the perfect first food for your baby. It is low in volume (measurable in teaspoons rather than ounces), but high in concentrated nutrition for the newborn. Colostrum has a laxative effect on the baby, helping him pass his early stools, which aids in the excretion of excess bilirubin and helps prevent jaundice.”1

Colostrum actually works as a natural and 100% safe vaccine…. [this antibody] protects the baby in the places most likely to come under attack from germs, namely the mucous membranes in the throat, lungs, and intestines.”1

2. If you continue to nurse your baby for 4 to 6 weeks…

If you continue to nurse your baby for 4 to 6 weeks you will be helping him stay healthy through this short time when he is so little. Also, you will most likely have figured out this “nursing thing” during these first few weeks. By this time nursing feels more natural and easier to you.

Babies who are breastfed:

  • are sick fewer times during the first year of life
  • are less likely to become diabetic later in life
  • have a reduced risk of obesity as they get older

During this 4 to 6 week time your body realizes you did not have twins, unless you did of course :-).

Our bodies are made to nurse even twins. As you may have noticed, your milk supply could “feed an army”. But suddenly the amount of milk you produce decreases. This is completely normal. You are still making plenty of milk. Your body has just realized you had only this one baby. It has figured out how to regulate to your babies needs.

Do not worry. You are still making exactly the right amount of milk for your baby. These weeks are a common time for mothers to supplement with formula. A time when they feel like their milk has “dried up”.

BUT it hasn’t and you now know the secret. Your body is amazing and has figured out the supply and demand that is exactly right for your baby.

Here is some info from La Leche League International about how to know if you are making enough milk:

“I want to know if my breasts are making milk normally. Do I have enough milk?

This is a common breastfeeding concern. Many women wonder if their experiences are within the “normal” range. Here are some common concerns:

My breasts are no longer leaking. Am I not making enough milk? Leaking has no relationship to how much milk a mother is making. Once your milk supply is well established, leaking normally diminishes or ceases. Some mothers experience leaking longer than others.

When I pump I find that one breast produces more milk than the other. Is something wrong? Every woman’s breasts are a little different, and since humans are not symmetrical, breasts aren’t either. It is common for one breast to have more milk-producing tissue than the other. In fact, sometimes babies will prefer the more- or the less-productive breast, and this is perfectly normal.

My breasts no longer feel “full” when it is time for a feeding. Is my milk supply decreasing?  When a mother’s milk supply adjusts to her baby’s needs, the feelings of fullness or engorgement she may have felt early on will subside.

I no longer feel the let-down, or milk-ejection reflex. This may occur as time goes on. Some mothers do not feel a let-down at all, but they can tell by watching their baby’s pattern of suck and swallow when their let-down is occurring.”2

Bibliography:

1. http://www.lalecheleague.org/faq/colostrum.html

2. http://www.llli.org/faq/normal.html

Coming up… Breastfeeding 3 to 4 Months and Breastfeeding for 6 Months

Happy Nursing!!

Benefits of Breastfeeding: Part 2

Posted by elizjcurran on November 17, 2014 at 8:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Reblog from this website. Might want to head there for an easier read: http://crazy8breastfeeding.wordpress.com/2014/11/17/benefits-of-breastfeeding-part-2/



Our topic this month is:

 

The Benefits of Breastfeeding

 

Breastfeeding has so many benefits for the mother, baby, and even society I am going to discuss a few here and then continue to work on more in later posts. These will be documented benefits not just my own opinion. This will not be an exhaustive list, just what I find useful when working with moms who are asking questions about nursing their babies.

 

INFANTS: Decreases obesity of child

 

Breastfeeding decreases the risk for obesity in later life. Many studies have been done that show that the longer you breastfeed your baby the lower the chances of obesity later in life. Protection against obesity continues through teenage years into adulthood. Also the incidences of childhood obesity is decreased with a child has been breastfed.

 

A study of 2,087 children has concluded that babies breastfed for at least a year are leaner than those weaned earlier. Babies never breastfed were the most likely to be overweight. (1)

 

“For each month of breastfeeding up to age 9 months, the odds of overweight decreased by 4%. This decline resulted in more than a 30% decrease in the odds of overweight for a child breastfed for 9 months when the comparison was with a child never breastfed.” (2)

 

Exclusive breastfeeding seems to have better effect against obesity than breastfeeding and formula combined, but more research is needed. “Bottle-fed full-term infants who are appropriate for gestational age have a 3.2 times greater risk of rapid weight gain between ages 2 and 6 years when compared to breastfed infants.” (5)

 

Why?

 

There are several thoughts about why breastfeeding reduces the risk of a child being overweight.

1.Because a breastfed baby can control how much milk they get they are able to self regulate their intake of food. Formula feed babies are generally fed based on how much is left in the bottle.

2.“Formula-fed infants have higher plasma insulin concentrations and a more prolonged insulin response. Higher insulin concentrations stimulate more deposition of fat tissue, which in turn increases weight gain, obesity, and risk of type 2 diabetes. Also, the high protein intake of formula-fed infants may stimulate the secretion of insulin.” (2)

3.A study has shown that babies who had the highest breast milk intake had better leptin levels. Leptin is the hormone that is said to decrease appetite and control how fat a person is.

 

My opinion?

 

The fact that a baby can control the amount of food that he/she is getting during a feeding makes the most sense to me. Many times I have seen parents lovingly have their baby finish a bottle because the doctor said the baby should drink such and such an amount at each feeding. I know personally I have done this. With my first two children I was only able to breastfeed for a short period of time. When I was forced to change over to formula feeding I remember watching the bottle and checking how much he/she got at each feeding and trying to have the baby finish the bottle. It is so different when nursing. When the baby is finished and full he/she just stops.

 

 

 

MOTHERS: Promotes mothers weight loss

 

During pregnancy a woman gains weight and body fat. Breastfeeding may help promote weight loss after you have her baby is born. “At 12 weeks postpartum, exclusively breastfeeding mothers had lost more total body weight than mixed feeding mothers.” (3) Studies vary but most point to a greater loss of weight in exclusively breastfeeding women than in women who do not breastfeed.

 

A breastfeeding mom can burn as many calories as an hour on a treadmill just by sitting and breastfeeding her baby. (4) Studies have shown that the weight reduction from breastfeeding continues years into a woman’s life even after she stops breastfeeding.

 

“In the short term, breastfeeding women experience greater weight and fat loss than non-breastfeeding women. Furthermore, women who breastfeed for longer than 6 months and those who do so exclusively are more likely to achieve greater weight loss.” (5)

 

My opinion?

 

What could it hurt? Some studies show a weight loss by breastfeeding exclusively and some show no significant difference. Breastfeeding has so many other benefits to the mom and baby that it seems worth it to me and hopefully we see some weight loss in the long run :-)

 

 

 

SOCIETY: Reduced parent absences from work

 

This is a double benefit: A breastfed baby is healthier and the parents have less time off from work due to illness. I like this one. “..breastfed babies are half as likely to get sick in the first year of life as those receiving artificial baby milks. If the baby doesn’t get sick as often, the mother will miss less time from work.” (6)

 

Breastfeeding a baby boosts his/her immune system and helps protect him/her from childhood illnesses, infections, and chronic conditions. When a child is attending a child care program while you are at work he/she is being exposed to many germs and viruses. Your breast milk gives your baby a strong defense against these infections. This means both mom and dad miss less work making the parents and the employer happy. But mostly making that dear baby happy.

 

One-day absences to care for sick children occur more than twice as often for mothers of formula-fed infants. (7)

 

My opinion?

 

I know that my babies that were breastfeed were sick less often than the two of my children that only had a short breastfeeding experience. so from personal experience, of which I have had a lot, I know this to be true.

 

 

What now? Leave a comment and let me know what you think.

 

Bibliography:

1.www.unicef.org.uk/BabyFriendly/News-and-Research/Research/Obesity/Duration-of-breastfeeding-linked-to-reduced-obesity-risk/

2.www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/nutrition/pdf/breastfeeding_r2p.pdf

3./www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1746-4358-3-18.pdf

4.www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/11/breastfeeding-weight-loss_n_1665709.html

5.www.andeal.org/vault/2440/web/200911_Breastfeeding_JADA.pdf

6.www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=5&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CDgQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.feedgoodfactor.org.uk%2Fdownloads%2F1294330441-Breastfeeding-return-to-work-booklet.pdf&ei=NpdqVL6_COXnsATKs4KIDw&usg=AFQjCNHPgAspfyy_w5v0oy0VoKgl16D9uw&sig2=dF819Z-bQSZvKJH-qfwnIg&bvm=bv.79908130,d.cWc

7.www.perinatalservicesbc.ca/NR/rdonlyres/6A2A2690-B9BF-4D1C-ABC6-9477425BCCD5/0/BFGuidelinesBreastfeedingHealthyTermInfantsJune2012.pdf

 

Benefits of Breastfeeding

Posted by elizjcurran on October 29, 2014 at 7:55 AM Comments comments (0)

This is a reblog from: http://crazy8breastfeeding.wordpress.com/2014/10/29/benefits-of-breastfeeding-part-1/


Our topic this month is:

“The Benefits of Breastfeeding”

Since I started this blog this week, this topic will continue as the topic for the month of November also.


Breastfeeding has so many benefits for the mother, baby, and even society I am going to discuss a few here and then continue to work on more in later posts. These will be documented benefits not just my own opinion. This will not be an exhaustive list, just what I find useful when working with moms who are asking questions about nursing their babies.

INFANTS:

Breastfeeding actually strengthens the bond that a mother has with her baby. When the baby nurses a hormone called oxytocin is released in the mothers brain.(1) Oxytocin is called the “love” or “trust” hormone. This hormone actually causes the mother to feel a stronger bond of love towards their infant. This hormone also lowers anxiety, stress, and fear.


What a perfect hormone to be flooding through our brains every 5 minutes while we are nursing. We all know that having a new baby can be a stressful time. Let alone the stress of getting to understand your new life as a parent. Who doesn’t need a little burst of calm and love during that 3am feeding.


I am not saying that a bottle feed baby and his/her mother cannot bond as well as a breastfeeding couple, please do not take this the wrong way. I am pro-whatever you feel is right for you and your baby. Feed you baby and love your baby, you do not have to breastfeed to do that. But this is a breastfeeding blog :-) (Just my 2¢.)


How does this help the infant? A mother that is calmer is able to interact with her baby in a more relaxed way.  Say your baby is fussy, just plain fussy. You are exhausted and feeling a bit overwhelmed. You sit down and pull that baby close to you and start to nurse. You feel relaxed, the baby calms, and you sit. You take a few minutes just sitting holding your baby when he/she is done nursing. You drink a big glass of water and enjoy this short time we have with our little ones before they are all grown up.

MOTHERS:

Breastfeeding actually reduces a mothers risk of breast, ovarian, and uterine cancer. When I first found this out I was like, you have got to be kidding me. But the research is there. I understood the breast cancer part, but the others I didn’t get that so I looked it up. The reason that it reduces cancer in each of these areas is because:


Breast cancer: The relative risk of breast cancer decreased by 4.3% for every 12 months of breastfeeding.(2) So the longer a woman breastfeeds has been associated with a greater protection from breast cancer. This one makes sense to me because nursing involves the breasts.


Ovarian cancer: Breastfeeding can reduce the chance of ovarian cancer by two-thirds. Some researchers believe that because breastfeeding reduces the number of times that you ovulate that this decreases your chances of producing mutant cells which may start the disease. Growing evidence indicates a protective effect of breastfeeding on ovarian cancer risk.(3)  Okay, so that makes sense to me. I know that most women have no periods during the time they are breastfeeding so it would make sense that they are not ovulating either.


Uterine cancer: Breastfeeding reduces the risk of uterine (endometrial) cancer.(4) During breastfeeding there is less stimulation of the uterine lining and therefore decreased risk of uterine cancer. This makes sense also because of the same reason I stated above: decreased periods = decrease uterine work.

SOCIETY:

Breastfeeding decreases the amount of trash we send to the landfills.

Waste heading to landfills is decreased but how?

There is less formula packaging itself thrown away. This includes:

  • the cans
  • the scoops
  • the lids
  • the paper on the packaging
  • the metallic tear off lids


There are fewer

  • bottles
  • plastic nipples
  • and the packaging for these


and (interestingly enough) less:

  • sanitary napkins
  • tampons
  • and the packaging materials for these


Now those last two kinda threw me for a minute. But because nursing your baby usually causes you to have no menstrual cycle for a few months then these items heading to the landfill would decrease. I personally had about 16 months after each baby that I was able to save those last few items from heading to the landfill.


Also fewer

  • diapers and
  • wipes
  • including the containers and boxes these come in

What? you ask…

Well, because babies are able to digest breast milk more efficiently there is less that comes out. So that means less diapers to change.(5) That sounds nice doesn’t it?


I hope this information was helpful to you.

What now? Leave a comment and let me know what you think.

Bibliography:

  1. http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/4433/1/WRAP_Feng_Emergent_Synchronous.pdf
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12133652
  3. http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2013/01/02/ajcn.112.044719
  4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10977111
  5. http://www.notmilk.com/greenbm.html

Why did we start this blog?

Posted by elizjcurran on October 21, 2014 at 3:20 PM Comments comments (0)



Between the two of (Vicki and myself) we have many years of breastfeeding experience. We are hoping to use this blog to share some of that information with you. 


Each month we are planning on having a "Topic of the Month" that we blog about. Our goal is to have a weekly breastfeeding post here that you will find useful. 


We will share:


  • from our own experiences
  • topics that breastfeeding moms are currently asking us about
  • topics of interest to the moms in our monthly café meetings
  • information about common breastfeeding concerns
  • reblogs of helpful breastfeeding information


Sit back, grab something to drink, and enjoy your stay :)


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